Archive for 'Unity Fund'

Helping Impoverished Rural Families with Cleft Needs

Many rural, farming families seeking medical care for their cleft-affected children must travel long distances over difficult terrain.  The nearest hospital may be located many hours or even a day’s journey from their homes in the countryside, and most families travel by long-distance bus or trains to get their child medical help. Not only is travel difficult, but they must also arrange for time away from their fields and farms, or herds, or ask for time away from their jobs.

Kenna presurgery 5.16

Medical care in China must typically be paid for up front, and it can be difficult for families to learn that they don’t have adequate funds for the surgery their child needs after they have made such a long journey. Read more.

Norah: LWB’s Featured Child of the Week

Six-month-old Norah lives with her family of seven in rural Anhui province. With little land and low income, this family of seven has experienced great financial hardship.  Read more.

Briella: Cleft Surgery for a Nomadic Family

Although we have done some work on the Tibetan Plateau through our Unity Initiative, we recently received our first application from a Mongolian family living there:  Briella and her mom. Briella’s mother is a nomadic herder on the remote grasslands of Qinghai province. During the summer, mother and daughter live in a tent as they follow a herd of grazing yaks. In the winter, when temperatures can get to -30 Celsius, they live in an earthen house with other herders in a remote village. Read more.

Celebrating the Dads Who Touch Our Hearts

On Father’s Day in the US, many of us reflect on childhood memories with our father. Some of us are fortunate enough to spend Father’s Day surrounded by our family, making memories we hope will last for years to come. Fatherhood is definitely a privilege worthy of celebration.

Ayres family

As a Board Member of LWB, I have been blessed to witness a number of men show me what it truly means to be a father. Read more

Unity Initiative: Help Us Say “Yes”

In the work we do helping impoverished families receive medical care in China, we have found that raising funds for children in need of cleft repairs can sometimes be a complicated affair, primarily due to timing. Today we wanted to explain how many of the surgeries are arranged.

Many rural, farming families live a long distance from the top hospitals in their province known for providing cleft surgeries. The nearest hospital or clinic isn’t just down the street. Instead, it may be located many hours or even a day’s travel from their homes in the countryside, and getting there often takes quite a lot of effort. Read more.

Unity In Action

Our Unity Initiative has seen a lot of action this past month! We thought now would be a good time to provide some updates on the families that we have committed to helping.

It’s now been two months since conjoined twins Harley and James had their separation surgery, and they are doing wonderfully.  Last week, their parents and grandmother brought them to the hospital in Shanghai for clubfoot repair.
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The 2016 Cleft Medical Exchange: Final Moments

Saturday morning our team headed to the hospital to make our final rounds on the children and to say goodbye to the wonderful Chinese team we had worked with all week.  Real friendships are formed in both the OR and on the ward, and it was hard to say those final farewells, not knowing when, if ever, we would meet in person again.

IMG_0708 Read more.

The 2016 Cleft Medical Exchange: A Few Farewells and the Final Day of Surgery

Friday in Kaifeng was bittersweet, knowing that it was the final day of surgeries and that the trip was soon coming to a close. We began the day with lots of discharges, and while we were sad to see our little patients go, we are sure the children were ready to leave the hospital! To each of them, we send our warmest thoughts and wishes for a beautiful future.

Mary Beth, Leo, and Violet discharge to our healing homes

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The 2016 Cleft Medical Exchange: Day Five

We had another great day in Kaifeng with eight more children receiving surgery today. We’ll start by telling you about the children who are orphaned first, and then introduce you to some of the wonderful rural families we were honored to help with medical care.

As we mentioned yesterday, four of the little boys on today’s OR schedule were from the Kaifeng PT Center, which is a government-sponsored project run by one of the past directors of the Kaifeng orphanage. Read more.

The 2016 Cleft Medical Exchange: Day Three

It’s always a wonderful thing to be able to write, “Yet another great day.” We started our Tuesday with morning rounds to check on the children who had surgery the day before.

Baby Leo was a little quiet this morning and gave everyone a scare with some pretty raspy breathing after drinking some formula, but his oxygen levels were good and his lungs were clear. We think he just wanted to keep us on our toes! He has also given us our very first “before and after photo” of the trip. Read more.

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