Tag Archives: adoption

Whispers

One of my wise friends posted the following on her Facebook page last week: “Some days it seems like bad news yells and good news only whispers.” Isn’t that the truth? Our society LOVES a good scandal, and bad news is the stuff of major headlines. For a topic like international adoption – trafficking, rehoming, and corruption will always make the New York Times. Parents trying their best, kids just being kids, and the thousands of successful families formed through adoption rarely get a mention.

Under my friend’s post, someone had left a wonderful comment. It said, “Remember to listen to the whispers.” I think we forget at times to stop and do just that. There are such terribly sad stories each day in the news, both in our backyard and overseas, and so it’s easy to think that everything about our world is going to heck in a hand basket. I’m grateful that I’m in a position with my work to see that there are countless small miracles and loving people out there that unfortunately the world just doesn’t ever hear about. Parents and children and volunteers and donors – going about their days as quiet heroes, trying to do the very best they can to lift each other up.

Many of you might remember when we posted about a wonderful boy named Ben who needed an adoptive home. He had been born with cerebral palsy, and he had watched almost all of his friends get chosen by families. Ben jumping He had reached the age of 13, just one year short of aging out of the adoption system forever, when a family in the US knew he was supposed to be their son. Ben was adopted just days before his 14th birthday. I recently got this photo from his mom now that he has been home for six months – and oh yes, I immediately burst into happy tears.  Read more.

Give What Counts

LWB has just launched our year end campaign: “Give What Counts.” If you didn’t receive a year end letter, you can read it here.

Give-What-Counts

The idea came to me when I was listening to a woman tell me that she dreaded the holiday season because all of her family members were so hard to buy presents for. I believe her exact line was, “I guess I’ll get my dad another nice golf shirt even though he has about 50. What do you buy for someone who already has everything?” Of course I told her that I had lots of ideas for what she could buy her father that would actually have real meaning on Christmas morning, such as the chance to go to school for a child in poverty or good baby formula for a child in a healing home. Read more.

There’s Still Time for Peace, Love, Adoption!

Peace love adoption

Yippee!  Due to popular demand, we are offering our Peace, Love, and Adoption T-shirts for just two more days.  This will be the absolute final opportunity to order one of these great conversation starters. Read more.

Meet Miss Meghan

In honor of Down Syndrome Awareness Month, LWB is posting a series of blogs about adopting a child with this special need.  

meg home 2

“Aren’t you terrified your child will have Down syndrome?” Those were the first words my friend asked me when I told her my husband and I were expecting our first child. I was slightly taken aback; the possibility hadn’t really struck me – and if it had, well, Down syndrome seemed like such an easy disability to face.
Read more.

Blossoming at Bethel

Many of our supporters might have heard of a wonderful charity called Bethel China.   Bethel is located outside of Beijing and is dedicated to helping orphaned children who have vision issues.  They are based on a small farm, with foster homes and a school on the same property. It is surrounded by countryside, where they grow their own vegetables and have chickens, goats, dogs, and horses.

walking home from school

Recently, Bethel contacted us to see if any of the children in our programs had vision issues who might benefit from their education and life skills opportunities.  We are very excited to report that three LWB children were accepted into their program! Read more.

Big News for Julian

Julian 5 We have some very exciting news about Julian, from our Hunan Foster Care Program: he now has an adoption grant of over $5,000 available on Reece’s Rainbow! Read more

Namaste from Fang and the Kids!

Fang Yoga Original

Fang Lee, who interned for Love Without Boundaries this summer, recently introduced the students at our Believe In Me school in Shaoguan to the fun benefits of yoga. Read more

Merry Marieli

During the 2012 LWB cleft exchange, Marieli had cleft palate surgery.  She was a particular favorite on the cleft trip, receiving lots of cuddling from the American and Chinese volunteers.  The doctors blogged about Marieli and her surgery, and you can read all about it here.  After surgery, Marieli recovered at LWB’s Henan Healing Home where she was adored.  In May, she graduated from the Healing Home into foster care.

Marieli bow Med

From the cleft exchange trip, we remember a curious and engaged little girl following our volunteers around to see what they were doing. We were so excited for the next adventure that we hoped lay ahead for her:  Adoption. Read more

Doing Somersaults for Fynn!

Love Without Boundaries is excited to announce a wonderful blessing! Fynn, whom you may have seen in our blogs Big Brother Fynn, and Wishing for Fynn a Forever Family, now has a $1500 grant towards his adoption.

Fynn Grant Photo

Read more

Realistic Expectations: Post-Adoption Struggles

We hope you have enjoyed our series on “Realistic Expectations” and wanted to end today by discussing the realities of post-adoption emotions. If you have found yourself standing in China becoming a parent, chances are it has been the culmination of a many year process of deciding that adoption is right for your family, paperchasing, and then waiting endlessly for the moment you meet your child. And then everyone is supposed to go off into the sunshine to live happily ever after, right? With so many adoption blogs talking about love at first sight and how wonderful those first few months together are, new parents can feel blindsided when they find themselves with an angry child who seems to hate them, or when they return home and have very intense feelings of “what have we done?” Read more.

css.php