Tag Archives: LWB

Life Skills Camp – Final Day

“Beginnings are often scary, and endings are often sad. But it is everything in between that makes it all worthwhile.”

Today was the final day of our first ever Life Skills camp, and we are giving thanks that it was an incredible week which all of us will remember forever.  Before I write more about today, I want to give a deep and sincere thank you to all of our amazing mentors in China, who volunteered this week to invest into these wonderful teens.  To Ruan Wei Chang, Liu Hui Ping, Zhuang Li Ying, Yang Ya Wen, Ma Yu Jia, Cai Yan Yue, Sun Li Ping, Chen Min, and Qi Rui – thank you for being a part of our team. And to our LWB China directors who led the camp (Cindy, Yvonne, and Susie) – your hearts are what make this foundation strong.

directorsLWB Directors Cindy, Yvonne, and Susie

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Life Skills Camp – Day One

Over the last twelve years, LWB has been honored to invest ourselves into teens who grew up in orphanage care but were never matched with permanent families. These young adults will usually end up on their own sometime between the ages of 18 and 24, and we want to do whatever we can to help them prepare for that day. This week we are excited to be holding our first ever Life Skills Camp, with the theme “The World is Better With Me In It.”


Fifty-two campers from Anhui, Jiangxi, Fujian, Guizhou, Gansu, and Hunan provinces are now in Beijing attending class sessions on etiquette and social skills, alcohol and drug use, self-esteem, sex education, money management, online safety, self-defense, and more. All reports so far are that they are having the time of their lives, and it never would have happened without your incredible help!
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Tiny Warriors

preemieSome of the most vulnerable children we help are babies who are born prematurely, many weighing just 1 kg. The standard of care for these tiny newborns usually includes being kept under a warmer or in an incubator, with constant monitoring of their breathing, temperature, and heart function. Many babies require oxygen supplementation and sometimes even the use of a ventilator. That is why it is so remarkable to us when orphanages call us to help preemies who were found abandoned outside and who often were not found for hours after delivery. They are the tiniest warriors, and their strength continually humbles us. Read more.

2014 LWB Cleft Exchange – Wednesday

When our team arrived to the hospital on Wednesday morning, it was time to say goodbye to several of our young patients.


Ted, Robert Owen, and Paul were the first to be discharged.  Our team is going to miss them so much!  Their repairs look beautiful, and Dr. Ness’s mom had made little hats which we put on them before they left for the train station.  Our warmest thoughts go with them as they travel back. Read more.

Visiting Foster Families

While on my recent trip to China, I was able to visit several of the foster care programs we run there. Currently LWB has foster care in 18 Chinese cities, and we are always looking to expand to new locations because we believe so strongly that children do best being raised in quality family care.

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At every location, I would visit both the local orphanage and then children in home care. Again and again, I was struck by the developmental differences between the two groups of children. Babies need families – pure and simple. And now, with the vastly changing population of orphaned children who almost all have special needs, I believe it is more important than ever to get orphaned children out into the local communities so that everyone can come to understand how amazing these kids are. Read more.

Rob: LWB’s Featured Child of the Week


Rob entered LWB’s Anhui Healing Home at the beginning of this year. He had an unrepaired cleft lip and palate and also a hernia. Read more.

LuLu from Liupanshui

Two-year-old LuLu is the newest student in our small but wonderful Believe in Me school in Liupanshui. On her first day, just a few weeks ago, we heard that she is a very timid child, who was nervous being in the classroom and would not speak much.

Lulu-1 Read more.

Learning in Lanzhou

Lanzhou 3

Every child deserves to know the joy of learning. For many children born with special needs in China, this opportunity is not available to them. For many reasons, these children are often unable to attend public school and for them education is only a dream.

For 34 very special children, that dream is about to become a reality. Thanks to the incredible generosity of some very special LWB supporters, their education is about to begin. Read more.


One of my wise friends posted the following on her Facebook page last week: “Some days it seems like bad news yells and good news only whispers.” Isn’t that the truth? Our society LOVES a good scandal, and bad news is the stuff of major headlines. For a topic like international adoption – trafficking, rehoming, and corruption will always make the New York Times. Parents trying their best, kids just being kids, and the thousands of successful families formed through adoption rarely get a mention.

Under my friend’s post, someone had left a wonderful comment. It said, “Remember to listen to the whispers.” I think we forget at times to stop and do just that. There are such terribly sad stories each day in the news, both in our backyard and overseas, and so it’s easy to think that everything about our world is going to heck in a hand basket. I’m grateful that I’m in a position with my work to see that there are countless small miracles and loving people out there that unfortunately the world just doesn’t ever hear about. Parents and children and volunteers and donors – going about their days as quiet heroes, trying to do the very best they can to lift each other up.

Many of you might remember when we posted about a wonderful boy named Ben who needed an adoptive home. He had been born with cerebral palsy, and he had watched almost all of his friends get chosen by families. Ben jumping He had reached the age of 13, just one year short of aging out of the adoption system forever, when a family in the US knew he was supposed to be their son. Ben was adopted just days before his 14th birthday. I recently got this photo from his mom now that he has been home for six months – and oh yes, I immediately burst into happy tears.  Read more.

Jillian’s Journey

Jilian 1In mid August, a tiny baby girl was found abandoned with an extremely bloated stomach.  She was taken to an orphanage in rural Anhui, and the staff there called LWB immediately. We moved her urgently to Anhui Children’s Hospital for testing, and doctors diagnosed her with severe malnutrition and blood poisoning.  They estimated her to be approximately 5 months old even though she weighed just 2 kg.  Little Jillian, as she was named by our volunteers, had a long road ahead of her to survive.  She was immediately given blood transfusions because of her extreme anemia. Read more.