Tag Archives: Nutrition

Uganda Update: More Than Posho

Have you ever heard of posho?  We sure hadn’t until we first became involved with helping children in Uganda. We now know that posho is the #1 staple of a Ugandan diet. Posho is ground maize, or corn, mixed with water until it forms a huge block that can be cut into pieces that then can be easily picked up to eat.

Posho fills up tummies, but on its own it does not have a lot of nutritional value. For children in the village where our Believe in Me Kabale school is located, posho is often their primary food. Read more.

Let the Hot Lunches Begin!

This week we celebrated the grand opening of LWB’s Kitchen House at our Believe in Me school in Rangsei!

lwb-kitchen-house

In this Cambodian village, many of the parents have left to find work elsewhere, and the kids are “left behind”. As we mentioned in our blog, Hunger in Cambodia, this country has the highest infant and under-five mortality rate in the southeast Asia region, with malnutrition being a key cause of child mortality. According to some reports, up to 45 percent of all Cambodia children — more than 1 in 3 — are stunted due to malnutrition. Read more.

Hunger in Cambodia

As I hope you have heard, LWB has now expanded several of our program areas into Cambodia. One of our primary focuses in Cambodia will be in the field of nutrition, and today I wanted to give you a bit of background on why we feel that is so important.

During my trip to Cambodia in September, one of things I saw clearly in the rural villages I visited was that the majority of children I met were stunted in their growth. Read more.

Our New Sustainable Nutrition Program in Uganda

Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.

When we visited Karukoba Village in Uganda in August, we were alarmed by how underweight some of the children were. Many of these children get just one meal per day which often consists of beans and posho, or cornmeal. Surely this was an area in which our Nutrition program could make a difference.

Uganda girl carrying water

We decided to implement a program that would not only give the children the food that they need but also be sustainable — in other words, a program that would give the villagers the tools to feed themselves down the road. Read more.

Learning About Uganda Together

As I imagine is the case with many of you who support Love Without Boundaries, I first became aware of LWB when we adopted my youngest daughter from China. They helped to fund her heart surgery while she was a baby in China, and once we brought her home, they provided us with priceless pictures of her.

LWB’s “Abigail” in 2010

I wanted to give back to this organization who had given so much to us, and so I have been a volunteer with LWB’s Education program for the past couple years, helping administer the Believe in Me schools. Read more.

A Calf is Born!

We have a special announcement to make about the birth of the newest member of the LWB family in Uganda!  As you might remember, when our CEO Amy Eldridge was in Uganda, she helped purchase a female cow for the village we are helping near Kabale. We were thrilled that the cow we bought was pregnant, and this past week we received this joyous letter from Innocent, the man with whom we are working to improve the lives of children in Karukoba village:

Innocent Amy Equator
Read more.

Cambodia: Part Three

If you pick up any travel guide to Cambodia, you will see under the “weather” section that almost all of them say you should never travel in September, due to the rainy season.  But of course I wasn’t heading to Cambodia for tourism purposes, but instead to meet the local children there.  So rainy season or not, I was on my way.  Before I left, I received an email from Leng, the man I was going to meet there, which simply said, “Please prepare for mud.”  I will admit readily that I was woefully unprepared, and I should have paid more attention in school to what “monsoonal rains” really mean.

cambodia

We left for the first village at 7:30 in the morning, in the pouring down rain, and our brave tuk tuk driver was soaked to the core before we even climbed aboard. Read more.

Uganda: Part Four

I hope you have enjoyed getting to know the children from Karukoba village in Uganda a bit more, although I am sure you are like me in finding it difficult to know they are facing so many challenges. You might also be thinking that you are happy this blog series is now done, since I know I write far too much each time. (Hence my difficulty with Twitter!)

princess-evalyne-darisonPrincess, Evalyne, and Darison

On my final night in the village, I asked some of the local people why they feel the region has remained in a cycle of poverty. Read more.

Uganda: Part Two

Yesterday I wrote Part One of a blog series on my recent trip to Uganda, and today I would like to share a bit about how I found myself standing on a remote hilltop in Karukoba village in the first place.

It all came down to honeybees.

African beehivesAfrican beehives

As the LWB Board began discussing where we would take our programs to help more children, we began to clearly see that while we understand the complexities of working in China backwards and forwards, we had a lot to learn about orphan and vulnerable child programs in other countries. And every individual country of course has its own needs, challenges and laws in place, so I had a whole lot of research to do. Read more.

Mango, Watermelon, Strawberries and Bananas!

With the onset of summer, the children in our Education Nutrition program are enjoying the abundance of seasonal fruits and vegetables as part of their schoool “snack”.

Lara watermelon 6.16
Read more

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