Tag Archives: orphan

Tiny Warriors

preemieSome of the most vulnerable children we help are babies who are born prematurely, many weighing just 1 kg. The standard of care for these tiny newborns usually includes being kept under a warmer or in an incubator, with constant monitoring of their breathing, temperature, and heart function. Many babies require oxygen supplementation and sometimes even the use of a ventilator. That is why it is so remarkable to us when orphanages call us to help preemies who were found abandoned outside and who often were not found for hours after delivery. They are the tiniest warriors, and their strength continually humbles us. Read more.

Joseph: LWB’s Featured Child of the Week

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Joseph is ten years old and lives with his foster family. He often plays sports with his friends after school. Joseph wants to learn to play ping pong and has been practicing his exercises to enter a gymnastics competition. Joseph’s interest and progress in physical activities and sports is remarkable considering that he had spinal surgery for a meningoencephalocele. He hasn’t let this challenge slow him down one bit. Read more.

“I’ll Always Be Your Son, and You’ll Always Be My Dad”

Jaden came home January 2013 at the age of 3 ½. He celebrated his 5th birthday just a couple of weeks ago, and last week we celebrated his 500th day in our family. He has really thrived at home.

It has only been recently that he has started talking a little bit more about his time as an orphan, and the most common way he describes it revolves around feeling “alone.” He tells us “I am very happy that you came to get me” and “I’m glad you didn’t leave me alone any longer.” He did tell us once “I’m glad you got me, but why did it take you so long to find me?” … which was heart-warming and heart-breaking at the same time.

Jaden and Tim
Today’s blog was written by Tim Sanford, an “LWB Dad” who adopted Christopher. Read more.

Daisy and Michael, Waiting Still

When there are so many children who are waiting to be matched with families each day, it is not uncommon for a child to be looked over a few times before the perfect family for them finally finds them.  Michael and Daisy are two such children. They have been waiting on the shared list for some time now and are currently in our education program in Chenzhou.  We are so excited to be able to share the news that their orphanage has agreed to WAIVE their orphanage donation fee for any families interested in adopting these children!

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Daisy is nine years old. This little flower is full of self-esteem and independence. Her confidence radiates as she performs, and she immediately volunteers herself to be chosen to be in activities or performances at her special needs school. Read more.

2014 LWB Cleft Exchange – Wednesday

When our team arrived to the hospital on Wednesday morning, it was time to say goodbye to several of our young patients.

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Ted, Robert Owen, and Paul were the first to be discharged.  Our team is going to miss them so much!  Their repairs look beautiful, and Dr. Ness’s mom had made little hats which we put on them before they left for the train station.  Our warmest thoughts go with them as they travel back. Read more.

Visiting Foster Families

While on my recent trip to China, I was able to visit several of the foster care programs we run there. Currently LWB has foster care in 18 Chinese cities, and we are always looking to expand to new locations because we believe so strongly that children do best being raised in quality family care.

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At every location, I would visit both the local orphanage and then children in home care. Again and again, I was struck by the developmental differences between the two groups of children. Babies need families – pure and simple. And now, with the vastly changing population of orphaned children who almost all have special needs, I believe it is more important than ever to get orphaned children out into the local communities so that everyone can come to understand how amazing these kids are. Read more.

Rob: LWB’s Featured Child of the Week

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Rob entered LWB’s Anhui Healing Home at the beginning of this year. He had an unrepaired cleft lip and palate and also a hernia. Read more.

Whispers

One of my wise friends posted the following on her Facebook page last week: “Some days it seems like bad news yells and good news only whispers.” Isn’t that the truth? Our society LOVES a good scandal, and bad news is the stuff of major headlines. For a topic like international adoption – trafficking, rehoming, and corruption will always make the New York Times. Parents trying their best, kids just being kids, and the thousands of successful families formed through adoption rarely get a mention.

Under my friend’s post, someone had left a wonderful comment. It said, “Remember to listen to the whispers.” I think we forget at times to stop and do just that. There are such terribly sad stories each day in the news, both in our backyard and overseas, and so it’s easy to think that everything about our world is going to heck in a hand basket. I’m grateful that I’m in a position with my work to see that there are countless small miracles and loving people out there that unfortunately the world just doesn’t ever hear about. Parents and children and volunteers and donors – going about their days as quiet heroes, trying to do the very best they can to lift each other up.

Many of you might remember when we posted about a wonderful boy named Ben who needed an adoptive home. He had been born with cerebral palsy, and he had watched almost all of his friends get chosen by families. Ben jumping He had reached the age of 13, just one year short of aging out of the adoption system forever, when a family in the US knew he was supposed to be their son. Ben was adopted just days before his 14th birthday. I recently got this photo from his mom now that he has been home for six months – and oh yes, I immediately burst into happy tears.  Read more.

Gideon

Last week, a tiny baby boy came into the world weighing just 1 kg.  When he was found outside, he was taken to the local orphanage.  Staff there called LWB immediately to see if we could help him, as his body was extremely cold and he was spitting up green fluid.  

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We moved this fragile preemie to the biggest children’s hospital in his province, where he remains today fighting for his life. Read more.

Jillian’s Journey

Jilian 1In mid August, a tiny baby girl was found abandoned with an extremely bloated stomach.  She was taken to an orphanage in rural Anhui, and the staff there called LWB immediately. We moved her urgently to Anhui Children’s Hospital for testing, and doctors diagnosed her with severe malnutrition and blood poisoning.  They estimated her to be approximately 5 months old even though she weighed just 2 kg.  Little Jillian, as she was named by our volunteers, had a long road ahead of her to survive.  She was immediately given blood transfusions because of her extreme anemia. Read more.

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