Tag Archives: special needs

Meet Miss Meghan

In honor of Down Syndrome Awareness Month, LWB is posting a series of blogs about adopting a child with this special need.  

meg home 2

“Aren’t you terrified your child will have Down syndrome?” Those were the first words my friend asked me when I told her my husband and I were expecting our first child. I was slightly taken aback; the possibility hadn’t really struck me – and if it had, well, Down syndrome seemed like such an easy disability to face.
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The Adoption of Boys

I wanted to add an extra day to this blog series because a reader asked about why there are so many more older boys available for adoption now than there were in the past.   Again, I don’t have any way to look at the entire adoption system as a whole and can only go off of the orphanages we have worked with for years, but I do have some thoughts on why more older boys are now available.

One important thing to remember is that when international  adoptions first began in China in the early 1990s, most (not all, but truly MOST) families wanted the youngest baby possible.  Back then, some families would even turn down the referral of a healthy baby girl if the child was over twelve months of age.  Read more.

The Changing Face of China’s Orphans

With the recent news that Russia has closed its international adoption program, many articles on adoption from other countries have made headlines as well. Several I have read talked about the huge decline in adoptions from China, but most blamed it on more stringent requirements for adoptive families. Few articles touched on the other main reason that adoptions have slowed, which is the changing population of orphaned children.

Over the next few days, I would like to discuss some of the reasons for this shift. Read more.

Dancing for Joy: It’s National Adoption Month!

November is National Adoption Month! We invite you to take a few moments to celebrate with us, the LWB volunteers and their families who danced their hearts out in this feel-good video.

Although LWB is not an adoption agency, we feel passionately that we must do all we can to help orphaned children find permanent, loving homes. Read more.

Ruth: LWB’s Featured Child of the Week

Ruth at schoolRuth is a sweet six-year-old girl who works hard in school despite cognitive delays. Ruth enjoys all of her classes but is particularly fond of her Mandarin and music classes. She finds math challenging, but fortunately a special needs school is located near her orphanage where Ruth can be in a supportive learning environment. The school provides the special attention and patience this lovely girl deserves. Ruth loves going to school each day, and. with your support, she will be able to continue to learn in a supportive and encouraging environment. Read more.

A Visit to Shantou Is Like Coming Home

Returning to the Shantou orphanage is always like coming home to me. I have been visiting this orphanage for over nine years, and two of my children spent the beginning of their lives in this facility. This trip was especially poignant to me as the word “changes” kept swirling through my head. There are so many changes in China each year, both wonderful and somber, and my heart felt split in two as it soared with joy at moments but then also crumbled at the increasingly complex needs. Everyone with a heart for the orphaned has to face the reality that almost every child abandoned now has a medical need, and so the issues the nannies face are often immense. The days of orphanages being filled with healthy baby girls due to the one child policy are over, and yet that myth is still perpetuated in news articles and blogs. Read more.

An Adoption Story: Kai

Do you ever wonder about the children we blog about here?  Have they been matched?  Are they home with their families this holiday season?  How are they doing?  We are very fortunate that some adoptive parents contact us after they return home with their newly adopted child to help us answer these questions.
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PT Camp Beginning in Guizhou

For the past few weeks, our blog, LWB Community, has been unavailable; however, we are happy to report that it’s working again! Today we’d like to repost some blogs from the past few weeks that were published on the main Love Without Boundaries website (lovewithoutboundaries.com). We’d like to thank our readers for their patience.

For the last several years, LWB has been blessed to have teams of PTs and OTs who have been willing to travel to China at their own expense. These dedicated professionals hold “therapy camps” for orphanage staff who wish to learn how to best care for their children with special needs. This year’s camp is being held in Guizhou province, with Michelle Murphy, Lisa Hoffman, Julianne Murphy, and Cindy Wu making up the team. The Zhongshan orphanage in Liupanshui has agreed to host the camp.

Early Saturday morning, our team started the day in Guiyang, the capital city of Guizhou Province. After a quick walk to the Wal-Mart from some last minute supplies, they then met up with several staff members from the Guiyang orphanage who would be traveling with them to the training. But the first logistical issue was getting all of their supplies onto the train to western Guizhou! For anyone who has traveled by train in China, you know that the train stations often have multiple layers of stairs to navigate, and the crowds are extremely large.
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Beautiful Cloud

A chance meeting with Cloud by Paula and her Hunan-born daughter during a return visit to her orphanage last year made a permanent dent in their hearts and cemented their determination to help advocate for this sweet girl. Cloud will celebrate her 12th birthday next week. In her short life, she has grown in inner strength despite her tough start. She entered orphanage care just two years ago and in that time has shown that she is a caring and loving girl.
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More Love

Eleven years ago today I stepped off a train into mainland China for the first time. I look back on that moment now and smile as I remember thinking it might be the only time I would ever be there. It was my first adoption trip, and I had a thousand thoughts running through my mind, from excitement to fear to exhaustion to anticipation.
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