Tag Archives: special needs

What About the Boys?

Many of us have ideas in our head about what adoption from China looks like. These ideas have likely been influenced by media (i.e., the 2005 film, “China’s Lost Girls”), press (covering China’s one-child policy), friends, family, and maybe even our own experiences.

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Over the years, adoption from China has evolved in a number of ways. You might have previously read our blog series about The Changing Face of China’s Orphans. Read more.

New Website Launch: Adopt Special Needs

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The number of children being internationally adopted has dropped over 50% in the last decade, for a myriad of reasons. Many orphanages overseas, which used to be filled with “healthy” babies, are now home primarily to children born with medical needs. For many potential adoptive parents, the thought of adopting a child with special needs can often seem overwhelming. LWB is excited to announce the launch of our new ADOPT SPECIAL NEEDS (ASN) website to help educate parents about the most common needs seen in children waiting for families. Read more.

Get Ready for Fall and Shop for a Cause!

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Over the last few weeks, many children we know have excitedly shopped for brand new school supplies, filled their lunch boxes with delicious snacks, strapped on their backpacks, and posed for first day of school photos, before climbing onto a big yellow bus headed for the adventure of a new school year. It has been a time of excitement. anticipation, and maybe a little nervousness. Education is the promise of exploration, discovery, growth, and stimulation. For children with special needs in China, however, the opportunity to experience all these things is very limited and often an impossibility. Read more.

Believing In Every Child

In early 2004, Love Without Boundaries was working with the Shantou orphanage in Guangdong province.  Dr. Huang, the orphanage doctor at the time, told us how very sad he was that so many children in the orphanage were unable to attend school due to being born with special needs which weren’t readily accepted by society.

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At the time, this included children born with issues such as missing limbs, albinism, cerebral palsy, and other health needs.  Many public schools were not willing to accept these children as students, and so the Shantou orphanage had many children who were not receiving any type of education at all.   Read more.

Meet Miss Meghan

In honor of Down Syndrome Awareness Month, LWB is posting a series of blogs about adopting a child with this special need.  

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“Aren’t you terrified your child will have Down syndrome?” Those were the first words my friend asked me when I told her my husband and I were expecting our first child. I was slightly taken aback; the possibility hadn’t really struck me – and if it had, well, Down syndrome seemed like such an easy disability to face.
Read more.

The Adoption of Boys

I wanted to add an extra day to this blog series because a reader asked about why there are so many more older boys available for adoption now than there were in the past.   Again, I don’t have any way to look at the entire adoption system as a whole and can only go off of the orphanages we have worked with for years, but I do have some thoughts on why more older boys are now available.

One important thing to remember is that when international  adoptions first began in China in the early 1990s, most (not all, but truly MOST) families wanted the youngest baby possible.  Back then, some families would even turn down the referral of a healthy baby girl if the child was over twelve months of age.  Read more.

The Changing Face of China’s Orphans

With the recent news that Russia has closed its international adoption program, many articles on adoption from other countries have made headlines as well. Several I have read talked about the huge decline in adoptions from China, but most blamed it on more stringent requirements for adoptive families. Few articles touched on the other main reason that adoptions have slowed, which is the changing population of orphaned children.

Over the next few days, I would like to discuss some of the reasons for this shift. Read more.

Dancing for Joy: It’s National Adoption Month!

November is National Adoption Month! We invite you to take a few moments to celebrate with us, the LWB volunteers and their families who danced their hearts out in this feel-good video.

Although LWB is not an adoption agency, we feel passionately that we must do all we can to help orphaned children find permanent, loving homes. Read more.

Ruth: LWB’s Featured Child of the Week

Ruth at schoolRuth is a sweet six-year-old girl who works hard in school despite cognitive delays. Ruth enjoys all of her classes but is particularly fond of her Mandarin and music classes. She finds math challenging, but fortunately a special needs school is located near her orphanage where Ruth can be in a supportive learning environment. The school provides the special attention and patience this lovely girl deserves. Ruth loves going to school each day, and. with your support, she will be able to continue to learn in a supportive and encouraging environment. Read more.

A Visit to Shantou Is Like Coming Home

Returning to the Shantou orphanage is always like coming home to me. I have been visiting this orphanage for over nine years, and two of my children spent the beginning of their lives in this facility. This trip was especially poignant to me as the word “changes” kept swirling through my head. There are so many changes in China each year, both wonderful and somber, and my heart felt split in two as it soared with joy at moments but then also crumbled at the increasingly complex needs. Everyone with a heart for the orphaned has to face the reality that almost every child abandoned now has a medical need, and so the issues the nannies face are often immense. The days of orphanages being filled with healthy baby girls due to the one child policy are over, and yet that myth is still perpetuated in news articles and blogs. Read more.

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