Tag Archives: special needs

The Girls Who Wait in 2015

November is National Adoption Month, and what better time to feature some of the girls in our programs who continue to wait for their opportunity to become part of a forever family!

Robin 9.15Robin, age 5 (Qiandongnan foster care)

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The Boys Who Wait in 2015

Despite the misconception that Chinese orphanages are filled with girls, approximately 75% of the orphaned children in China waiting for families are boys.

Changzhi boys2 10.15

We think so highly of the boys in our programs and want to share those who continue to wait to be chosen by a family. Some of these boys have been waiting for years. Read more.

Four Ways to Celebrate National Adoption Month

This November, please join us in celebrating National Adoption Month!

Michelle5 (1)

Whether we know and love someone who is adopted, are ourselves an adoptee, or have been privileged to have adopted a son or daughter ourselves, many of us have been touched by adoption. While Love Without Boundaries is not an adoption agency, adoption is something we celebrate and advocate for daily since the majority of children we have the privilege of working with are among the thousands of children in China currently without families of their own. Read more.

Advocate, Adopt, Sponsor, Share: Celebrate National Adoption Month

Nearly all of us here at Love Without Boundaries have been touched by adoption in some way, and so we love honoring and celebrating ADOPTION in the month of November!  One of our core beliefs is that all children deserve to know the love of a family, regardless of the country in which they were born. We have so much respect for the foster care system in the United States and celebrate when we hear that a child in need of a forever family here in our own country has been adopted!  However, our focus is China, and we want to use this month to highlight the thousands of orphaned children living in China, waiting for families to love them.

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Ellie: An Adoption Story


It has been a little over a year since Ellie has come home to our family. She is so beautiful and has quite a funny, adorable, kind, personality. Above all, Ellie has such a love for life! Read more.

What About the Boys?

Many of us have ideas in our head about what adoption from China looks like. These ideas have likely been influenced by media (i.e., the 2005 film, “China’s Lost Girls”), press (covering China’s one-child policy), friends, family, and maybe even our own experiences.


Over the years, adoption from China has evolved in a number of ways. You might have previously read our blog series about The Changing Face of China’s Orphans. Read more.

New Website Launch: Adopt Special Needs

ASN heart

The number of children being internationally adopted has dropped over 50% in the last decade, for a myriad of reasons. Many orphanages overseas, which used to be filled with “healthy” babies, are now home primarily to children born with medical needs. For many potential adoptive parents, the thought of adopting a child with special needs can often seem overwhelming. LWB is excited to announce the launch of our new ADOPT SPECIAL NEEDS (ASN) website to help educate parents about the most common needs seen in children waiting for families. Read more.

Get Ready for Fall and Shop for a Cause!

BIM graduate 2

Over the last few weeks, many children we know have excitedly shopped for brand new school supplies, filled their lunch boxes with delicious snacks, strapped on their backpacks, and posed for first day of school photos, before climbing onto a big yellow bus headed for the adventure of a new school year. It has been a time of excitement. anticipation, and maybe a little nervousness. Education is the promise of exploration, discovery, growth, and stimulation. For children with special needs in China, however, the opportunity to experience all these things is very limited and often an impossibility. Read more.

Believing In Every Child

In early 2004, Love Without Boundaries was working with the Shantou orphanage in Guangdong province.  Dr. Huang, the orphanage doctor at the time, told us how very sad he was that so many children in the orphanage were unable to attend school due to being born with special needs which weren’t readily accepted by society.


At the time, this included children born with issues such as missing limbs, albinism, cerebral palsy, and other health needs.  Many public schools were not willing to accept these children as students, and so the Shantou orphanage had many children who were not receiving any type of education at all.   Read more.

Meet Miss Meghan

In honor of Down Syndrome Awareness Month, LWB is posting a series of blogs about adopting a child with this special need.  

meg home 2

“Aren’t you terrified your child will have Down syndrome?” Those were the first words my friend asked me when I told her my husband and I were expecting our first child. I was slightly taken aback; the possibility hadn’t really struck me – and if it had, well, Down syndrome seemed like such an easy disability to face.
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