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A Visit to Qiandongnan Foster Care

‘Pack light’. As I ascended the steep steps in my heeled boots to our first foster family home in Qiandongnan, I was beginning to regret my footwear decision. The concrete steps were of uneven height, and no sooner did we get to the top of one flight then there was a corner and another flight of similar steps ascending ever upwards. It was with a sigh of relief that we walked along the front of a small apartment building and I was told that this was where the two families fostering Lewis, Chandler, Hanna and Clyde lived — in fact, all on the same floor. Knowing that we were almost there, the last flights of internal stairs in the building were a breeze. I just wanted to meet the children.

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Terrific Tara!

In early 2012 LWB began a foster care program in Kaili, Guizhou Province. One of the first children we took into our program was a baby girl born with dwarfism, whom we named Tara.

Tara-4

Tara had the most devoted foster mom, who wore her in a traditional Guizhou baby carrier for much of the day. Our local manager always enjoyed visiting her home each month, as she was such a good-natured baby who quickly grew into a very determined toddler. She loved visiting the market with her foster mom, and no matter what the temperature her favorite thing in the world was to be outside. Read more.

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Return to Kaili

Our first full day in China was spent in Qiandongnan, in the southeastern part of Guizhou province.  This was my third visit to this mountainous region, and I always love coming here because the foster families in our program are just fantastic.  As I’ve mentioned in past blogs, Qiandongnan is a Miao and Dong minority prefecture.

One of the first kids we met was Cecilia, seen above, who was leaving for her adoption day just a few hours after we arrived.   Read more.

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Hopes and Plans for Our China Trip

When I was a little girl, I remember seeing the passport of my friend’s father, and as I turned each page and saw the entry and exit stamps from different countries, I thought inside how wonderful it would be to someday have a little blue book of my own. I didn’t get that first passport until I was 35, when I adopted my first child from China, but I still remember the excitement I felt when the immigration officer firmly put his red stamp in it. I still feel that same excitement every time I land in China – and by the time you read this, I will probably be standing in the immigration line yet again.

Each time I make a trip to check on the children in our programs, I of course reflect back on previous journeys. I always have the same prayer leading up to departure:  that any child who truly needs our help will somehow cross my path. Read more.

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Journey to Guizhou – Day Two (Kaili)

The Qiandongnan Miao and Dong Autonomous Prefecture is located in the southeast corner of Guizhou. 80% of the people in this region are ethnic minority, with the largest group being the Miao. The capitol city is Kaili, and that is where we began our day.
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