LWB Community Blog


LWB’s 2019 Cleft Exchange – Day Three

Happy Day Three everyone!  Our team had another wonderful day in Lanzhou, with 9 children receiving surgery.  First up, of course, was morning rounds, to make sure every child who had surgery the day before was doing well post-op.  Two-second summary – they are! Kamryn’s lip repair looks absolutely beautiful, as you can see below.  […]

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Life Skills Camp – Day One

Over the last twelve years, LWB has been honored to invest ourselves into teens who grew up in orphanage care but were never matched with permanent families. These young adults will usually end up on their own sometime between the ages of 18 and 24, and we want to do whatever we can to help them prepare for that day. This week we are excited to be holding our first ever Life Skills Camp, with the theme “The World is Better With Me In It.”

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Fifty-two campers from Anhui, Jiangxi, Fujian, Guizhou, Gansu, and Hunan provinces are now in Beijing attending class sessions on etiquette and social skills, alcohol and drug use, self-esteem, sex education, money management, online safety, self-defense, and more. All reports so far are that they are having the time of their lives, and it never would have happened without your incredible help!
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2014 LWB Cleft Exchange – Wednesday

When our team arrived to the hospital on Wednesday morning, it was time to say goodbye to several of our young patients.

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Ted, Robert Owen, and Paul were the first to be discharged.  Our team is going to miss them so much!  Their repairs look beautiful, and Dr. Ness’s mom had made little hats which we put on them before they left for the train station.  Our warmest thoughts go with them as they travel back. Read more.

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Gideon

Last week, a tiny baby boy came into the world weighing just 1 kg.  When he was found outside, he was taken to the local orphanage.  Staff there called LWB immediately to see if we could help him, as his body was extremely cold and he was spitting up green fluid.  

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We moved this fragile preemie to the biggest children’s hospital in his province, where he remains today fighting for his life. Read more.

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Stable in the ICU

Yesterday we told you about two babies from our healing homes who were having surgery on the same day for complex heart defects.  We are so happy to report that both Chandler and Dominic came through their operations beautifully. Both children received BT shunt surgery, which is used to increase pulmonary blood flow.  This is often called the “first stage” surgery, and so both children will need an additional operation in the future.

SONY DSCLittle Chandler Post-Op

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Heart Surgery Day

chandlerLove Without Boundaries of course began after we met one tiny baby in China who needed heart surgery, and for the last ten years we have continued helping children born with congenital heart disease.  We wanted to let you know that two of the babies from our Healing Homes program are having surgery on Wednesday in China.  We sure would appreciate every good thought for these two beautiful children.

Chandler came into our hands as a tiny infant, with a diagnosis of pulmonary atresia, ventricular septal defect, and patent ductus arteriosus.  That is a mouthful for one little baby girl, isn’t it?   She got stronger and stronger at the Anhui Healing Home.  We are so grateful to all of the wonderful people who stepped forward to fund her operation.  She was admitted to the hospital last week, but then her surgery was postponed when the head of cardiac surgery was called out of town.  We decided to wait until he returned, and now Chandler is scheduled for Wednesday morning. Read more.

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Healing Home Grads


Just as June is the month for many high school and college grads around the world, it’s also been a time of celebration for many babies in our healing homes. The last few weeks we have been called by so many orphanages with really sick babies needing one-on-one care, and so it was time for some of the children in our homes to move onto LWB foster care to make way for new arrivals.  When little Noah came into our hands as a preemie, he weighed just under four pounds at one month old.   Now topping the scales at over 16 pounds, he is settling into life with his new foster mom. Read more.

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Realistic Expectations: Clothing

When I was waiting to adopt my first child from China in 1999, I read story after story in online forums about the infamous “clothing police” I was sure to encounter on my adoption trip. I was warned about grannies who would come up and yell at me or wag their fingers if my child-to-be wasn’t covered from head to toe even if I thought the outside air temperature seemed fine.

Well, now I can say that many of the clothing police are women I greatly admire. They are devoted foster moms and grandmas and orphanage nannies who have watched far too many children over the years struggle with issues like pneumonia and fevers when they fall sick. As I’ve already covered in my last two posts, many orphanages and foster homes don’t have central heating, and even in the southern provinces of China, the orphanages are quite cold at times. To protect children from the cold and becoming more vulnerable to infection, they are bundled, almost from the very moment that they come into the world. Read more.

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In Memory and In Hope

This has been one of the hardest winters I can remember in all of the years I have worked with orphaned children. As the temperatures drop, we know that pneumonia and other illnesses will spread quickly through orphanages, and we always pray for an early spring. I don’t think many people even stop to think about how fast a sickness can spread in an institution when 20-30 babies live in just one room. And for babies struggling with medical issues already, such as heart defects or breathing difficulties, they are very vulnerable indeed.
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Closing the “ER”

This past week we had to make the difficult decision to temporarily close our medical program to any new children with critical medical needs. The reason? Because we currently have so many urgent children on our website who haven’t been funded for their surgeries yet that we sadly cannot take on any more. I think most people who follow LWB’s work know that our medical program is run entirely by volunteers – amazing, giving, compassionate people who do this work because they want to help save lives – and so it is very hard to continue to have orphanages call us asking for help for their sickest babies, knowing that saying “no” means that child will most likely not survive. Saying NO to a child who is clinging to life…. well, I know you realize how terrible and gut wrenching that is. Read more.

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